The influence of the new media

In the last five decades or so, the media and its influence on the societies, has grown exponentially with the advance of technology. A common urban person usually wakes up in the morning checks the tv news or newspaper, goes to work, makes a few phone calls, eats with their family or peers when possible and makes his decisions based on the information that he has either from their co workers, Tv news, friends, family, financial reports, etc. In our work we usually know what we have to do, based on our experience and studies, however on our routine life and house hold chores we mostly rely on the mass media to get the current news and facts about what is important and what we should be aware of. We have put our trust on the media as an authority to give us news, entertainment and education.

The influence of the new media

History[ edit ] In the s, connections between computing and radical art began to grow stronger. It was not until the s that Alan Kay and his co-workers at Xerox PARC began to give the computability of a personal computer to the individual, rather than have a big organization be in charge of this.

Although causally unrelated, conceptually it makes sense that the Cold War and the design of the Web took place at exactly the same time.

The influence of the new media

His now famous declaration in Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man that " the medium is the message " drew attention to the too often ignored influence media and technology themselves, rather than their "content," have on humans' experience of the world and on society broadly.

Until the s media relied primarily upon print and analog broadcast models, such as those of television and radio. The last twenty-five years have seen the rapid transformation into media which are predicated upon the use of digital technologies, such as the Internet and video games. However, these examples are only a small representation of new media.

The use of digital computers has transformed the remaining 'old' media, as suggested by the advent of digital television and online publications.

Even traditional media forms such as the printing press have been transformed through the application of technologies such as image manipulation software like Adobe Photoshop and desktop publishing tools. Shapiro argues that the "emergence of new, digital technologies signals a potentially radical shift of who is in control of information, experience and resources" Shapiro cited in Croteau and Hoynes Russell Neuman suggests that whilst the "new media" have technical capabilities to pull in one direction, economic and social forces pull back in the opposite direction.

According to Neuman, "We are witnessing the evolution of a universal interconnected network of audio, video, and electronic text communications that will blur the distinction between interpersonal and mass communication and between public and private communication" Neuman cited in Croteau and Hoynes Neuman argues that new media will: Alter the meaning of geographic distance.

Allow for a huge increase in the volume of communication. Provide the possibility of increasing the speed of communication. Provide opportunities for interactive communication.

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Allow forms of communication that were previously separate to overlap and interconnect. Consequently, it has been the contention of scholars such as Douglas Kellner and James Bohman that new media, and particularly the Internet, provide the potential for a democratic postmodern public sphere, in which citizens can participate in well informed, non-hierarchical debate pertaining to their social structures.

Contradicting these positive appraisals of the potential social impacts of new media are scholars such as Ed Herman and Robert McChesney who have suggested that the transition to new media has seen a handful of powerful transnational telecommunications corporations who achieve a level of global influence which was hitherto unimaginable.

Scholars, such as Lister et al. Based on the argument that people have a limited amount of time to spend on the consumption of different media, Displacement theory argue that the viewership or readership of one particular outlet leads to the reduction in the amount of time spent by the individual on another.

The introduction of New Media, such as the internet, therefore reduces the amount of time individuals would spend on existing "Old" Media, which could ultimately lead to the end of such traditional media. The problem with this is that the definition must be revised every few years. The term "new media" will not be "new" anymore, as most forms of culture will be distributed through computers.

New media is reduced to digital data that can be manipulated by software as any other data. Now media operations can create several versions of the same object. An example is an image stored as matrix data which can be manipulated and altered according to the additional algorithms implemented, such as color inversion, gray-scaling, sharpening, rasterizing, etc.

The "old" data are representations of visual reality and human experience, and the "new" data is numerical data. The computer is kept out of the key "creative" decisions, and is delegated to the position of a technician.Rebekah Mercer has a maths degree from Stanford, and worked as a trader, but her influence comes primarily from her father’s billions.

The fortysomething, the second of Mercer’s three.

Sep 07,  · Given the powerful role of social media in political contests, understanding the Russian efforts will be crucial in preventing or blunting similar, or more sophisticated, attacks in the Evidence-based medicine is valuable to the extent that the evidence base is complete and unbiased.

Selective publication of clinical trials — and the outcomes within those trials — can lead to. The media has both positive and negative influences on people.

The media can make a person more aware of what is happening on a local, national and global level, or it can warp one’s perspective of the truth.

The media has the capacity to ruin society by encouraging false ideals, praising. For many Americans, Russian hacking remains a story about the election. But there is another story taking shape. Marrying a hundred years of expertise in influence operations to the new world.

After leaving The Washington Post in , Carl Bernstein spent six months looking at the relationship of the CIA and the press during the Cold War years.

Impact of media use on children and youth