Sociology and social groups essay

Describe how a social group differs from a social category or social aggregate. Distinguish a primary group from a secondary group. Define a reference group and provide one example of such a group.

Sociology and social groups essay

Social Movements Social Groups Social groups and organizations comprise a basic part of virtually every arena of modern life.

Sociology and social groups essay

Thus, in the last 50 years or so, sociologists have taken a special interest in studying these scientific phenomena from a scientific point of view. A social group is a collection of people who interact with each other and share similar characteristics and a sense of unity.

A social category is a collection of people who do not interact but who share similar characteristics. For example, women, men, the elderly, and high school students all constitute social categories.

A social category can become a social group when the members in the category interact with each other and identify themselves as members of the group. In contrast, a social aggregate is a collection of people who are in the same place, but who do not interact or share characteristics. This competition with the other group can also strengthen the unity within each group.

In the beginning, the Eagles and Rattlers were friendly, but soon their games evolved into intense competitions. Later in the same experiment, though, Sherif had the boys work together to solve mutual problems. When they cooperated with one another, the Eagles and Rattlers became less divided, hostile, and competitive.

Parishioners at a particular church, for instance, may evaluate themselves by the standards of a denomination, and then feel good about adhering to those standards.

If most parishioners shine in their spiritual accomplishments, then the others will probably compare themselves to them. Primary and secondary groups Groups play a basic role in the development of the social nature and ideals of people. Primary groups are those in which individuals intimately interact and cooperate over a long period of time.

Examples of primary groups are families, friends, peers, neighbors, classmates, sororities, fraternities, and church members. These groups are marked by primary relationships in which communication is informal.

Members of primary groups have strong emotional ties. They also relate to one another as whole and unique individuals. In contrast, secondary groups are those in which individuals do not interact much. Members of secondary groups are less personal or emotional than those of primary groups.

These groups are marked by secondary relationships in which communication is formal. They tend to relate to others only in particular roles and for practical reasons. An example of a secondary relationship is that of a stockbroker and her clients. The stockbroker likely relates to her clients in terms of business only.

She probably will not socialize with her clients or hug them. Primary relationships are most common in small and traditional societies, while secondary relationships are the norm in large and industrial societies.

This does not mean, however, that secondary relationships are bad. For most Americans, time and other commitments limit the number of possible primary relationships. Further, acquaintances and friendships can easily spring forth from secondary relationships.

A small group is small enough to allow all of its members to directly interact. Examples of small groups include families, friends, discussion groups, seminar classes, dinner parties, and athletic teams. People are more likely to experience primary relationships in small group settings than in large settings.

The smallest of small groups is a dyad consisting of two people. A dyad is perhaps the most cohesive of all groups because of its potential for very close and intense interactions.

It also runs the risk, though, of splitting up. A triad is a group consisting of three persons. A triad does not tend to be as cohesive and personal as a dyad. The more people who join a group, the less personal and intimate that group becomes. In other words, as a group increases in size, its members participate and cooperate less, and are more likely to be dissatisfied.

In this case, people may feel that because so many others are available to help, responsibility to help is shifted to others. Similarly, as a group increases in size, its members are more likely to engage in social loafing, in which people work less because they expect others to take over their tasks.

Leadership and conformity Sociologists have been especially interested in two forms of group behavior:Free social groups papers, essays, and research papers. My Account In this essay, I discuss the role of social science for societies and individuals, how individuals relate to societies and the function of rules in societies as a main concern of social science.

[tags: Sociology, Social Status, Social Interactions] Good Essays words. Social Groups Thus, in the last 50 years or so, sociologists have taken a special interest in studying these scientific phenomena from a scientific point of view.

A social group is a collection of people who interact with each other and . Social groups are the most stable and enduring social units.

They are important to both, their members and their whole society. A very important characteristic of social groups is that they encourage regular and predictable behavior, Sociology and Social Groups Essay The current.

Social Groups Thus, in the last 50 years or so, sociologists have taken a special interest in studying these scientific phenomena from a scientific point of view. A social group is a collection of people who interact with each other and share similar characteristics and a sense of unity.

A social group consists of two or more people who regularly interact on the basis of mutual expectations and who share a common identity. It is easy to see from this definition that we all belong to many types of social groups: our families, our different friendship groups, the sociology class and other courses we attend, our workplaces, .

Different social groups, all show different trends in relation to religious beliefs and religious organistions. This essay will only very briefly touch on the difficulty of defining religious organisations, as this is not its focus.

It shall split the social groups into three major categories, age.

Sociology: Social Cliques in High School | Essay Example